The only possible solution to the Israel-Palestine Conflict – Part II of III

The Current War – Hamas is to blame for triggering this conflict and Israel is to blame for triggering a war.

Hamas’ rocket attacks in violation of the peace deal are absolutely to blame for the start of the conflict, but we can always leave it to Israel to escalate it to a disproportionate level with, very importantly, rather murky objectives that, like I have argues in part 1, never really get fulfilled.

And lest anyone is thinking the war is only between Israel and Hamas they are sadly mistaken. For this war is not only between Israel and Hamas, it is a high stakes geo-political chess game being played by Iran, Hezbollah and Syria on one side – who use Hamas as a mere proxy — and Israel is doing the bidding of the out-going American administration along with, possibly, reacting to internal political dynamics.  An interesting article by William Kristol at New York Times website on why America needs Israel to fight. I find the probability of success of the approach postulated by Mr. Kristol – even if it were to succeed – to actually weaken Iran to be close to zero.

The net result is of course that the Palestinian civilian population is dying “en masse” with few Israeli civilian deaths also. Israel is of course to blame for the untold civilian casualties (600 and counting) but Hamas, Iran and Syria have to take equal blame for the shedding of not just Israeli blood but also Palestinian blood — Iran, Syria and Hamas know well the pattern of Israeli response to Hamas ‘ provocations.

When it is so mindless why does it repeat with frightening regularity?

My opinion is because status-quo is preferable to powerful forces on both sides.

There are many in Israel to whom a two-nation solution is not palatable and they have grave mis-givings that it will truly bring any benefits in the form of peace to Israel. They use fear-mongering, invoke past Jewish suffering and most importantly demonize all Arabs as a group to continue reacting with violence.

Similarly, elements in Iran, Syria and Hamas keep the pot boiling because the idea of Israel itself is an anethema to them and they have stated this openly. Also, as the article titled, “What the Gaza Conflict Means for the Middle East?” at New York Times postulates these wars where its prodigies, Hezbollah and Hamas do not get vanquished outright, provide cover to Iran to build its nuclear bomb and hence a true deterrent that will force concessions from Israel at the negotiating table at some later date. I believe that.

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5 Responses

  1. according to CNN Israel was the agressor and struck first i believe in early november or december.

    http://thebivouac.wordpress.com/2009/01/06/cnn-confirms-israel-broke-ceasefire-first/

    • Hi,
      I watched the video and as you know well there are claims and counter-claims ad infinitum.
      It is true that Israel didn’t life the blockade right from the start of the ceasefire but it is also true that Hamas never stopped smuggling in weapons. Nor did it stop sending rockets BTW. It is just that the intensity was lower.
      What escalated this is the killing of 6 Hamas gunmen who were digging a tunnel by Israel. It is after that the rocket barrage intensified.
      I was simply trying to get to the fact that both sides have lot of blame to share, with Israel’s reaction of course always being exeggarated ostensibly to teach Palestinians a lesson but it always backfires and hence the endless cycle.

  2. i like how you call it smuggling when they are an elected government and supposedly sovereign. hamas was created by israel according to ron paul.

    here’s something to think about.

    http://cspanjunkie.org/?p=1635

    video of ron paul saying israel created hamas below

    http://votersthink.org/?p=975

  3. We can’t solve the Israeli-Palestinian situation using the blame game. (e.g., if you look into it, Israel directly and indirectly supported Hamas in the 1970s as a means of weakening the PLO. The Israel rightwing continued to support Hamas even when Hamas uncompromising nature became apparent, because it could be counted on to shut down the peace process. In the words of one US official, Israel’s behavior is like lighting its own hair on fire and then beating its own head.

    Hamas came to power in Gaza after an election that Fatah advised against, but Rice/Bush insisted on.

    Hamas is very violent. Is Hamas uncompromising? Actually, they are willing to live with a “hudna”. A hudna is a indefinite truce, which continues until something material changes the balance of power between the two parties. Hamas has consistently offered “hudna” to Israel. Of course, this is interpreted/interpretable as Hamas does not recognize Israel’s right to exist.

    The just solution is, from the point of view of the Indian and the American founding fathers, is one secular state in which Jews and Palestinians live as equals.

    However, because of the Holocaust, the Jewish state will be clung to. Therefore a two state solution is needed. The Palestinian state cannot be a set of Bantustans, which is what the Israeli right wing/settler movement is intent on making happen.

    Regarding negotiations, there is a difference to be contended with – one in which negotiations are conducted to find a framework and the other in which negotiations are conducted to iron out the fine details of an otherwise accepted proposal. I think each side has a different view of what negotiation means.

    Can good faith negotiations take place? Perhaps, but only under US umbrella.

    • Arun,

      I agree with your 1st, last and all comments in the middle but would like to focus on the last comment: a peace can be negotiated, US of course has to lead, but it needs more than US. US 1st needs to hammer out agreements with Russia, Israel, Eqypt, Saudi Arabia and Jordan at the very least and then these countries, most importantly Russia, needs to get Iran and Syria to call off its subversive and aggressive support for Hamas. Only then can we have both Israel and Palestinians arm-twisted to come to the table. And that’s just the start.

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